Art

The Visual Spheres of Günter Rössler

Günter Rössler is one of the early leading Eastern bloc photographers that exposed the everyday life of the DDR. At a time that was characterized by scarcity and limited access to cultural influences, in particular Western pop culture, Rössler developed his own autonomous signature. He represented the DDR with a typical aesthetic that not only told the story but also made it feel as though you are part of it.

Günter Rössler studied photography at the Academy of Fine Arts in Leipzig. In 1951 he started his empire as a freelance fashion and journalistic photographer. His work intriguingly told the various stories about the DDR’s social life. After a number of years, Rössler started to focus on fashion photography and grew into a true pioneer. His authentic and spontaneous approach created exceptional photographs that told a personal story and at the same time expressed a certain aesthetic.

The work has been published for years in East Germany's leading fashion magazine, Sibylle. In 1981 Rössler was admitted to the Verband Bildender Künstler der DDR (Association of visual artists of the DDR). In 1996 he also became a member of the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Photographie (German Association for Photography). After his breakthrough as a fashion photographer, Rössler became one of the pioneers that introduced nude photography as a movement in modern art within the walls of the DDR. His first solo exhibition in 1979 presented in the Kunsthaus Grimma had a big impact. His nude models were exposed as strong natural women with a lot of self-confidence, which made them seem almost sculptural. Rössler's signature was in contrast with the standards of Western nude photography, which was less subtly produced. His work has depth and went beyond merely showing a naked woman. His work was therefore also noticed outside the walls of the DDR, magazines such as Fotographie, Fotokino-Magazin, Das Magazin, Modische Maschen, and even Playboy published it regularly.

After an impressive career as photographer and artist, Günter Rössler died in 2012. He left a memorable oeuvre behind that will always be remembered as one of the leading signatures in German photography. APITIS Studios / Berlin is therefore presenting ‘Akt und Mode’, an exhibition that covers his most important visual spheres through the years.

‘Akt und Mode’ is presented in APITIS Studios in Berlin from 15 February until 28 April 2019 and has free access.

www.capitis-studios.de

Art

New Flagship store Molteni&C | Dada in London

This month the Molteni group opened its third global brand showcase in contemporary number one design city; London. This high-end artistic design venue is applicably situated against the famous V&A design museum in the heart of Chelsea. Creative director Vincent Van Duysen has succeeded in creating a unique quiet moment in such a vibrant city. This new store represents a romantic life full of Italian flair, propagated in an "ordinary" looking house with two levels divided into many different zones.

To start with an impressive entrance, built on an inner door opens onto two floor-to-ceiling glass. Then you arrive at an iconic spiral staircase made out of walnut wooden and marble steps. Van Duysen made some sensational stylistic choices like the winter gardens brimming with all sorts of luxurious plants. This place is characterized by the theme of alternating perceptions that emerge in the surprising color and texture palette travertine marble and Korean walnut executed in various shades of gold and warm and bone greys.

This space is gracious, welcoming, dimensional and fluid thanks to the innovative distinctive details that will display the collections of designers such as Vincent van Duysen, Rodolfo Dordoni, Ron Gilad, Foster + Partners, Jean Nouvel and Patricia Urquiola and many others each in their own unique way.

To celebrate the opening, the new London Flagship Store will display a series of works by contemporary artists that develop The Collector’s House project, a concept presented at the 2018 Salone del Mobile and, subsequently, in the New York Flagship inaugurated last May. The Collector’s House, curated by art curator Caroline Corbetta, is an ideal collection that contributes to creating an ecosystem in which design and art enhance each other. Some designers that contribute are: Giuseppe Buzzotta (1983); Alessandro Dandini de Sylva (1981), Cleo Fariselli (1982), Emiliano Maggi (1977) Matteo Nasini (1976) and Vincenzo Schillaci (1984) are the six young Italian artists, represented by Rome’s Galleria Operativa.

www.molteni.it

Art

Italian elegance in the big city

In the heart of Manhattan, at 160 Madison Avenue, a modern and unique store is opening its doors. This is the first Flagship Store of Moteni&C, Dada, and UniFor, joining forces to project the classic and elegant Italian style into New York City. A collaboration between aesthetic and cultural harmony mixed with personality and imagination.

Showcasing the concept of a modern art collector’s house, the store hosts a collection of works by contemporary artists. Discover monochrome sculptures by Santo Tolone and pop hieroglyphics by Stephen Felton alongside the works of young artists.

Designed by Vincent van Duysen, the store also creates a platform to support artists in the height of their creativity that will be presented at the Molteni Museum.

Art

Prada collaborates with Francesco Vezzoli for “Opera Pompidou”

The Italian artist Francesco Vezzoli is internationally well-known for mirroring the glamour of Hollywood in his unsaleable paintings. Now he partnered up with the fashion house Prada to produce the twelve costumes for the “Opera Pompidou” live performance, which was presented in the Centre Pompidou on the 19th October. The reason for this unique project was the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the museum for arts and culture in the heart of Paris. The Italian artist’s visionary world of elaborate references intertwines with the collection of the museumto create a series of special live art performances staged by Vezzoli. Each artist was wearing a costume made by Prada which references to the art work and brings it to life. In this totally emotional reinterpretation of the modern and contemporary collections of Centre Pompidou, the visitor finds himself in a new immersive experience.

www.prada.com

Art

Michaël Borremans Dances at Zeno X

Michael Borremans has launched his sixth solo exhibition at Zeno X, a Mecca of contemporary painting in the heart of Antwerp, Belgium. Sixteen Dances, the title of the show, is primarily a reference to the changing and multi-faceted nature of painting, and how the medium has the ability to forever adapt to the contemporary zeitgeist.


The paintings are structured into three series: this is a typical way of working for Borremans, who has a necessity to always dig deeper and discover new meaning through multiple variations of the same theme. The paintings function almost as vignettes, which give the exhibition a cinematic feel: a clear continuum is interrupted by random stills which confuse any possible narrative structure. This gives an ambiguous and dark atmosphere, encapsulating the morbid and grotesque scenes present in the paintings, such as babies dancing covered in blood and figures in straight jackets. Borremans undoubtedly takes references from Bosch, Bruegel and Goya in this series of works, which questions the morality of human nature and exploits its subconscious savagery and cannibalism. While absorbing these haunted tableaux, viewers are left feeling dread and disorientation: a feeling that permeates in our current age and society.


The exhibition will run until October 14th 2017.

Art

Iris Schomaker – Come to the Edge

Berlin based artist Iris Schomaker, will display her first Benelux exhibition “Come to the Edge” at the Reflex Gallery in Amsterdam showing off her expressive large-scale watercolor and oil-works on paper featuring figures in various states of repose.

The show will consist purely of new works representing an arresting close-up of a single figure, lying reading, resting, sitting curled up, unaware of the viewer’s gaze because “it’s more like a sudden glimpse-something unexpected. These figures do not offer contact. Their faces are blank, vanishing.” As the artist herself said.

Is exactly this blankness that took Iris to project on to the image looking at the very anonymity of those faces as an invitation to the viewers to bring something of their own being surrounded by powerfully immersive and contemplative figures. Moreover the figures in the newer works from the German artist are often accompanied by a symbolic animal that is more idea, atmosphere, and energy, more a sprit guide that brings a strange, irritating and inspiring energy rather than a flesh and bones companion.

In muted shades of black and grey, with only the thinnest veil of oil wash in faded aquamarine or yellow, the overall impression of the palette is decidedly monochrome. The figures are resolutely not portraits; the final creation is given by a work of research through images of unknown people like photos, sketches, ripped pages of magazines, combined with her drawing and creativity, in order to give birth to an incredible mix between classic paintings and current graphic novels.

The exhibition will run until April 26th 2017

www.irisschomaker.de

Art

Hate Speech

Aggression and Intimacy

Hate Speech is a collaborated art project with artists: Thomas Baumann, Candice Breitz, Elena Aya Bundurakis, Tony Cokes, Petra Cortright, Folkert de Jong, Verena Dengler, Ryan Gander, Yuri Pattison, Signe Pierce, Jim Shaw, Gunther Skreiner, Markus Sworcik, Amalia Ulman, Martha Wilson, Joseph Zehrer. Presented until 18 April 2019 in the Künstlerhaus, Halle für Kunst & Medien (KM-) in Graz, Austria. The exhibition addresses the function of the institution as a place for societal, free debate and democratic discussion.

Free speech and freedom of public expression are an ever returning and essential element in human life. In order to live alongside each other, it is always necessary to keep searching for a way to live next to each other. Interacting means developing. By “picking” interactions as a human being, you choose to connect, which means blending yourself with the public and private.

This artwork was developed in response to current relationships between politics and multi-media. Communication contains so many layers today, layers within which humanity needs to wonder whether there is still real freedom of speech within the use and especially abuse of media.

The individual partakes in the interaction process, subconsciously searching for individual meaning and with that, the possible connotations of their own personal intimacy. Interaction arises from people responding to the social and political happenings around them, becoming more sensitive and their psyche becoming more aware.

The way people are connected to online social channels today and how they interact to one another is a tendency that determines a whole new order in communication. Users develop an extraordinary urge for connection, which often seems to be in conflict with their personal boundaries. Questions about identity arise and create an inner intimate crisis. The media has been a dominant middleman for a long time, and has become even more powerful due to the rise of social media platforms. These channels do not only report and interpret the news. Interaction is unfiltered and not viewed in light of context. This creates a solid breeding ground for fake-news and the manipulation of public opinion resulting in an overly sensitive personal psyche.

Online communication results in a contrasting combat between dedication and discarding, visibility and anonymity. The collective reaction to this has resulted in people challenging each other in a hostile manner. Users dare not express their real desires in this uncertain, undetermined environment where only roles are adopted, instead of real personalities. “Intimacy” is central in this collection; it conveys a need for demarcation from outside space and ‘The Other’, for retreat and silence, so as to be able to recognize and describe one’s own personal self.

www.km-k.at

Art

The Process of Existence

Art duo Vera Lehndorff and Holger Trülzsch have opposite backgrounds, but when they coalesce, an interesting socially critical manifesto emerges. Lehndorff, better known as “Veruschka” was a fashion model and developed through her career a critical view on the human body as a whole. Trülzsch started to look for social limits at the student movement in Munich during the sixties, where he mainly questioned art, music and politics.

Both were fascinated by the idea of "transformation", a concept that caused a lot of commotion in the 70s and 80s. Through bodypainting and photography, the duo challenged the media to mix traditional roles and question them instead of merely embodying and emphasizing them. Veruschka redefined the expectations of her as a regular model, she didn’t portray just one common version she transformed and hid herself beneath many.

Their work created a counter-reaction against the norms of capitalist society, especially the strict standards of beauty and presentation. The duo converted existing art methods into new symbolic expressional forms, with which they presented the complex stages of the human existence process in a new and less conventional way.

The sixties, seventies and eighties were times of change, and the work of Vera and Holger contributed with great success. They were criticized and rejected, but today their ideals are used as inspiration, that is why the SR Contemporary Art gallery in Berlin now officially display these leading controversial artworks.

www.srcontemporaryart.de

Art

Ballenesque — A Retrospective by Roger Ballen

With its probing, challenging images between painting, drawing, photography and installation, the work of American art photographer Roger Ballen is one of a kind. He was born in New York in 1950 but has lived and worked in South Africa for over 30 years and is often named as one of the world’s greatest art photographers. The term Ballenesque, which is already a firm part of the lexicon, is synonymous with his rich monochrome vision, psychological insights and constant reinvention.

His work is being displayed in the permanent collections of some of the best art institutions such as MoMa in New York, Tate Britain in London, Stedelijk Museum and Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. Reflex Gallery in Amsterdam is hosting a double-sided exhibition of Ballen’s art, comprising a mini retrospective of 30 works and a selection of 150 Polaroid images. These constitute the first display of color images by the artist during his entire career and offer the opportunity to own an original Roger Ballen image in the form of a Polaroid. The exhibition will be open from the 23rd November until the 30th December 2017.

www.reflexamsterdam.com

Art

FENDI announces partnership with Galleria Borghese

The Italian fashion house Fendi has always had a strong connection to Rome and the fine arts. It all started, amongst others, with the restauration of the Trevi Fountain in 2015, followed by the opening of the first floor of Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana to the public, where Fendi’s headquarters are now. The brand recently announced a three-year-partnership with the prestigious Galleria Borghese in Rome, which is guarding the most relevant and best preserved paintings by Italian painter Caravaggio. Hence Fendi will be supporting the Caravaggio Research Institute, which sees the constitution at Galleria Borghese as a center of studies, diagnostics and artistic-historical research aiming to become a primary reference. To spread the word about the project, Fendi and the Galleria Borghese created an exhibition on the artist which will be taking place all over the world at the most high-end-venues. However, the first exhibiton that Fendi will be supporting is the “solo one”, which is dedicated to Gian Lorenzo Bernini, the most representative artist of the Baroque period in Rome. The exhibition will be inaugurated on the 31st of October and will be open to the public from November 1st 2017 to February 4th 2018.

www.fendi.com

Art

Lunar Garden

"After spending many years traveling to Japan I became fascinated with the dry gardens in Kyoto, specifically the way in which the gardens are permanent yet completely ephemeral and remade every day,” said Daniel Arsham, an american artist who studied at the Cooper Union in New York. His new solo exhibition is on view at Visionaire in New York until the 5th of November.

The work, titled “Lunar Garden,” is a combination of architecture, sound, and an immersive environment that reinterprets the traditional Japanese rock garden: surreal and dreamlike, Arsham’s oasis uses a vibrant pink color scheme, features a moon-like orb spanning 3 meters, and peculiar patterns in the sand that the artist freshly rakes every day. Traditional greenery, such as the bonsai, has been replaced by a petrified tree and a lantern. For Arsham, the use of color is a new experiment. Previously, he has relied on a palette of black, white and gray tones. The reason for this shift is that Arsham is colorblind, but has recently been able to see vibrant colors thanks to special glasses: the radical change is his sense of sight and perception of color has prompted an important new visual language for the artist which can be witnessed for the first time in “Lunar Garden.”


Art

Bottega Veneta and SCoP: when fashion supports art

Tomas Maier, Bottega Veneta’s creative director, has never hid his passion for art, making it a proper flagship of the Venetian brand’s attitude. Bottega Veneta showed for the first time its strong commitment to art and culture in 2001, when Maier introduced the “Art of Collaboration”: an ongoing project which invites photographers and visual artists in order to reflect brand’s aesthetic inside its campaigns.

This year the brand confirms its ever-lasting addiction to art, partnering with the Shanghai Centre of Photography in order to support four key international exhibitions hold at the most prestigious photography institute in China. SCoP is indeed considered worldwide the city’s very first place entirely dedicated to photography showcasing its best and diverse genres.

“Made in Germany: German photography from the 19th century to today” will be the first exhibition supported by Bottega Veneta. The projects will comprises an unparalleled selection of iconic masterpieces that together with contemporary examples will give an up-to-date and fresh touch to the entire exhibition.

The exhibition will run until April 2nd 2017
www.bottegaveneta.com

Art

ELECTRIC CO - RE-Couture

Enchanted by clear pencil lines that tell more… Designer Conny Groenewegen captures her imagination into spatial drawings that make you almost part of it. The boundaries between 2D and 3D are a continuing signature in her art.

With a background in Art and Fashion, specifically knitting, she created a special relationship with interlocking loops coming from one continuous thread. When you make another manoeuvre, the pattern breaks. In conclusion: “you cannot impose or force anything without causing damage.” This theory turned into a philosophical approach for Groenewegen that resulted into the Fashion Machine-project; a suggestion to reconsider fixed archetypal forms. By changing forms, textures, materials and settings, new interesting insights appear and create another perspective to redefine the type.

The ELECTRIC CO artwork is a creation of a plastic monofilament that carries a rigid knitted structure in combination with softer, woollen yarns. The constructed 3D element emphasizes the upper body’s muscle contours and re-codes. At the same time the archetypal shapes of classical sweaters and bomber jackets accommodate ELECTRIC CO’s vibrant dynamics > electricco.co.

Photographer Anouk van Kalmthout photographed the artwork and created a mystifying universe. The picturesque, colorful and especially abstract landscapes give a dreamy feeling which impersonates this association of free interpretation. The lively use of light and shadow in fusion with the disorienting perspective gives this artwork a free sense to express. These photographs are an infinite vision full of the world’s fortuitous.

Credits:
Photography: Anouk van Kalmthout; model: Iheomy Nahr; make-up & hair: Yokaw; set assistant: Juliette Lizotte; production: Charlotte Corstanje; creative direction: Conny Groenewegen

 

www.connygroenewegen.nl

Art

Posthumous Exhibition in London and Paris Celebrating the Life and Work of Franz West

Franz West is widely known and revered for his 40-year career that features notable highlights such as his series of Adaptives in the 1970s, his Lemur-Heads scattered around Vienna as well as his use of unconventional materials in building furniture and his famously colourful work with paper mache.

Franz’s work requires us to take his hand and accept his invitation to actively engage with the art. For Franz, the meaning is not some ungraspable, floating figment in the ether. Rather the meaning is what we decide to grant to it and is the various experiences that are evoked upon our direct, personal interaction with the given piece. It is precisely this mirroring of the external that makes Franz’s work so inclusionary and what absolves him from any dangerous accusations of elitism or pretention. We are the essential, necessary final piece of the puzzle. Our realisations, our relationship and our connection with the pieces are paramount and take priority focus – how we respond, what we evoke, what we discover.

Franz is renowned for his light-hearted, open, playful and at times humorous quality paired with an underlying deeply introspective and subtly philosophical approach, driven largely by an understanding and respect of the free man to enjoy leisure and not always be so as Franz himself put it ‘deadly earnest.’

Vivacious, vibrant and interactive, this exhibition invites us to celebrate the extraordinary life and lively work of Franz West – to touch, to wear, to handle and to open yourself up to a rare and inclusionary experience of art as you have never had before.

The multi-faceted Austrian artist Franz West’s life and work (1947-2012) is posthumously celebrated as part of a major exhibition taking place at The Tate Modern, London and the Centre Pompidou, Paris from the 20th February to the 2nd June 2019.

www.tate.org.uk

Art

Fondazione Prada Presents “Slight Agitation 3/4: Gelitin”

“Slight Agitation” is a four part-project of newly commisioned, site-specific works hosted within the Cisterna of the Milan venue of Fondazione Prada. The third chapter of this exhibition project is an instalment by the Austrian collective Gelitin and called “Slight Agitation 3/4: Gelitin”. The project, titled POKALYPSEA-APOKALYPSE-OKALYPSEAP, features three large sculptures, which explicitly address classical architectural archetypes: the triumphal arch, the obelisk and the amphitheater. These rhetoric and monumental components are symbols as much as structures conceived for everyday inhabitation. The sculptures draw an arc from the insular and individual to the open-ended and collective, from the overtly erotic to the sublimated joy of togetherness. The central space of the Cisterna is occupied by Arc de Triomphe (2003/2017), which is a reproduction of an elephant-high male figure, bending over backwards, made of plasticine. 

The presence of a fully functioning water fountain transforms the exhibition space into a collective one, manifesting Gelitin’s liberating artistic approach. In the left side of the space, another gigantic sculpture, made up of polystyrene blocks, resembles a typical Inuit construction or a cigarette on top of a big table. The third sculpture, a wooden upward spiral, is reminiscent of an antique amphitheater. Visitors can enter the sculpture and are even invited to smoke a cigarette in the center of the installation. This banal act makes them instant protagonists of a short, ephemeral act that positions itself, according to Gelitin, somewhere between Samuel Beckett’s Theater of the Absurd and a karaoke performance. The exhibition will be open until the 26th of February 2018.

www.fondazioneprada.org

Art

Museo del Novecento and Fondazione Furla present Simone Forti: To Play the Flute

Museo del Novecento and Fondazione Furla present Simone Forti: To Play the Flute – a selection of performances by this Italian-born American artist, choreographer and dancer that will fill the Museo del Novecento’s Sala Fontana with sound and movement for three days.

This marks the first event of the Furla Series #01 – Time after Time, Space after Space, a performance- centred program that will feature five events from five different artists with varying backgrounds, influences and approaches to this form of expression.

Simone Forti, has been a leading figure in postmodern dance for over fifty years and has helped shaped the landscape of contemporary dance with performances that range from minimalist movement to improvisations that also featured spoken word. To Play the Flute is a reenactment of four seminal performance moments in Forti’s career that highlights her approach to the interplay of actions and objects, and they key role assigned to sound.

Forti’s famous Dance Constructions – now part of New York’s MoMa permanent collection – served as the foundation of her solid reputation in the 60’s art world thanks to her innovative ways of experimenting with the language of movement. The performances rethink the relationship between body and object, movement and sculpture, rules and improvisation and are based on everyday movements or interactions with objects. Personal expression and improvisation always appear to be hampered by the effort required to carry out a given physical task or follow certain rules.

The first Time after Time, Space after Space event will take place on the 21st to the 23rd of September in the Sala Fontana of Milan’s Novecento Museum. The program for Time after Time, Space after Space will include four more events featuring artists from around the world, at bimonthly intervals: Alexandra Bachzetsis (November 2017), Adelita Husni-Bey (January 2018), Paulina Olowska (March 2018) and Christian Marclay (April 2018)

www.museodelnovecento.org
www.fondazionefurla.org

Art

Fendi pays homage to Rome with Giuseppe Penone's Foglie di Pietra

Following Giuseppe Penone’s Matrice exhibition hosted at Fendi’s headquarters in Rome’s Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana, Fendi installs a new site specific artwork by the artist entitled Foglie di Pietra in Largo Goldoni. Thus, FENDI renews and highlights its undying bond with Rome by gifting the city and its people important artwork from one of the most celebrated contemporary sculptors.

Foglie di Petra (Leaves of Stone, 2016) is one of Penone’s most complex artworks: two tall bronze trees standing at 18 and 9 metres respectively, interlace their branches five metres above an 11-tonne sculpted marble rock. Archaeology and ruins, history and biology are intertwined with one another bringing attention to the permanent bond between nature and culture. A celebration of a deep synthesis between the flowing of natural and human time through a longing and romantic nostalgia for lost civilisations.

Through virtuous use of precious materials such as bronze and marble, Penone’s Foglie di Petra recalls the illusionism and marvel of Roman Baroque, while the fragments and the ruins inserted in the sculpture’s branches harken back to the Classic and Medieval era. What’s more, the artwork is the first oeuvre of a contemporary artist to be permanently installed in Rome’s public spaces and is bound to become a symbol of the identity of an ever-changing city that remains steadfastly linked to its historical roots.

www.fendi.com

Art

The world through Henk Schiffmacher’s “camereyes”

When Texas, Henk Schffmacher's daughter discovered her father's old 35mm negatives in a dusty drawer, she knew they had to be exposed for the world to see.

Dutch tattoo artist, Henk Schiffmacher has become known for his energetic and observational photographic work that is now being collected and exhibited for the first time ever. Highlighting the best and worst facets of modern society, this eclectic ensemble of pictures is a real representation of the world we live in through Schiffmacher's camera.

Taken between 1970 and 1985 these pictures give us a raw insight into the world of youths, bikers and tattoo fetishists from all around the globe – from Las Vegas, L.A., Amsterdam, and Tokyo to Mumbai, Manila, San Francisco and Kuala Lumpur.

This makes for an interesting juxtaposition: a wild mix of cultures, nationalities and excess against the backdrop of vintage cityscapes and timeless scenarios. Schiffmacher's photography offers a unique and brilliant view of the world as it was four decades ago.

Pure, direct and unprecedented just like photography should be.

www.schiffmachershoots.com

Art

Existenz

The Nussbaum Haus, built by architect Daniel Libeskind, dedicated to artist Felix Nussbaum in Osnabrück presents the spatial drawing “Existenz” of artist Brigitte Waldach. The installation gives the spirit of German-Jewish surrealist painter Felix Nussbaum an unexpected rebirth. His art gives an artistic insight into the life of one individual among the victims of the Holocaust. He was that individual itself who lived for a long time in fear of Nazi terror, a fear that has always characterized his work.

Waldach's spatial drawing embodies the center of existence in a distorted cube. With frightened excerpts and thoughts in the background coming from letters written by Felix Nussbaum.

The space expresses the "Raum für Gegenwart", which means the room of existence. Every wall illustrates a component of existence. On the wall of the "brain" the star of David is portrayed. This immediately recalls the gruesome persecutions, but for millennia this “star” has represented a spiritual unity. Waldach emphasizes this idea with white and black lines that merge and mirror the visible and invisible world of a fearful life. Through it weaves a red thread that reflects the lifeline of Nussbaum. A line that indicates how the fate of a young Jewish artist led to atrocious persecution.

This artwork is an ode to Nussbaum, but at the same time it is also an analysis of the life cycle. The individual circle of life is characterized by the endless creation and passing of different stages of activity. Between birth and death we experience situations of departure, separation, isolation, doubt and the constant presence of existential fear. The course of a life is a line of actions and reactions that an individual experiences.

The exhibition can be seen until November 10, 2019.

www.waldach.com

www.libeskind.com


Art

Ulay's Exhibition at Richard Saltoun, London

The very nature of Ulay’s art inadvertently resists all attempts at classification and defies categorisation. A self-proclaimed anarchist, Ulay’s work spans multiple platforms and offers a stark exploration of the dichotomy between the masculine and the feminine, exploring the fluidity of the self and the constant potential for transformation and experimentation with new identities. Ulay is one of our long-time favourite artists with whom we have previously had the incredible honour to work with on two separate projects.

From an early affection for the fleeting, transient and instantaneous process of the Polaroid to a traceable crossover in utilising the physical form through performance and body art, it is strikingly evident that the single common thread of Ulay’s work is awareness — in the obvious performative, physical sense of course but also in his social commentary.

Ulay’s unyielding lifetime commitment to dismantling and subverting the roots of complex themes of identity, particularly gender, by tackling the harmful human conflicts that arise from externally enforced notions of identity through his unprecedented format, are what have comfortably established his status as a true icon of polaroid photography and as the father of performance art.

From 11th January – 23 February 2019, the Richard Saltoun Gallery in London will host its first solo exhibition of Ulay’s work dating back to the 1970s and progressing right through to new works exhibited in public for the first time.

www.richardsaltoun.com

 

Art

Mystical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose + Croix in Paris

Mysterious, mythical and visionary themes, often drawn from literature, will be presented by the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in an exhibition called “Magical Symbolism: The Salon de la Rose + Croix in Paris”. It’s the first museum exhibition showing the highlights of a series of Salons, which were annually held in Paris from 1892 to 1897. At these art gatherings, images of femmes fragiles and fatales, androgynous creatures, chimeras, incubi and sinuous lines, attenuated figures and anti-naturalistic forms were the norm. Including approximately forty works by a cross section of artists, the possibility to take a fresh look at the legacies of late nineteenth-century symbolist art is provided. The exhibition is taking place until January 7th 2018 at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice.

www.guggenheim-venice.it

Art

POWERMASK: Walter van Beirendonk at the Wereldmuseum

From the 1st of September 2017 until the 7th of January 2018, the ethnographic Wereldmuseum in Rotterdam will host POWERMASK, an exhibition curated by Antwerp fashion designer Walter van Beirendonck. The exhibition is a journey through the deeply symbolic, totemic and patrimonial world of masks, an often underrated accessory in contemporary fashion. Van Beirendonck has incorporated masks into his fashion collections since the 1990s, sourcing inspiration from André Breton, Pablo Picasso and Pieter Bruegel’s caricatural portraits.

The exhibition will examine links between Western art and African masks, the supernatural rituals surrounding masks, masks in fashion, masks as fetishes, and numerous other aspects. Van Beirendonck has styled the 125 masks, unpacked from the Wereldmuseum’s archive, with colorful costumes and fashion silhouettes. The backdrop of the exhibition is a delightful patchwork of wall installations by contemporary artists such as Brian Kenny, Coco Fronsac and Charles Fréger, macabre paintings of James Ensor, playful illustrations by Keith Haring, and designs by haute couture heavyweights Viktor & Rolf and Jean Paul Gaultier.

www.wereldmuseum.nl

Art

The Beats and The Vanities, Larry Fink Exhibition at Armani/SIlos

A collection of exquisite black and white photographs from Larry Fink’s The Beats and The Vanities books will comprise the latest exhibition at Armani/Silos. The exhibition presents a unique opportunity for the legendary photographer’s work and idiosyncratic vision to be experienced as one as they have never before been shown together before.

Giorgio Armani himself is a great fan of Larry Fink’s work, finding his ability to capture form and line in such a fluid way something he can relate to as well as a designer. “Fink is a jazz fan, and you can almost view these images in terms of musical composition – people in flow, surprising us, possessing an unconscious sensuality”, he adds.

Born in Brooklyn and raised in a progressive and politically active family, Fink cut his teeth as a photographer as part of the late beat generation, when he hooked up with a group of beats at the age of 17. Political activism, protests and marches formed the photographers worldview who documented the times through his medium-format camera.

His pictures serve as a time capsule and a candid look into his world, perfectly capturing the sense of romance and rebellion that characterised the underground jazz-fuelled youth movement of the time. A regular editorial contributor for prestigious titles such as The New Yorker and Vanity Fair, it was the latter that recognised his ability to bring them something different if let loose to create.

His visual record of the famous and their surrounding courtiers is not concerned with who’s who – rather it focuses on what’s happening. As Fink himself describes it, he tries to embrace the souls of all people, regardless of their conditions.

The Beats and The Vanities, Photographs by Larry Fink will be on show at the Armani/Silos until the end of July 2017.

www.armanisilos.com